Hunting, Trapping, Tracking and Stalking



Photo - ISBC member Bogdana Kostova©

Building Spears



The start of a light weight, long shafted spear. Test fitted this arrowhead, but will affix a barbed spearhead, once I finish one. This should be an effective tool! Photo - ISBC member William Lammers©

 

 Building Hunting and Fishing Spears 

Author: ISMB member William Lammers


 

 

 

I select the Spear shafts, from along the drainage, not far from my house, for the small Vine Maples seem to grow more straight, competing for sunlight.

I then strip the green bark, which comes off easily, and use my knife as a draw blade, as to smooth the shaft, and take off any high spots.

 



I then, cut a notch, at the tip end of the shaft, with a small Hacksaw Blade "knife", such as seen in my Fishing Tin/Survival Tin (as I would in a survival situation), then place the Spearhead into the slot.


 

 

I select the Spear shafts, from along the drainage, not far from my house, for the small Vine Maples seem to grow more straight, competing for sunlight. Photo - ISBC member William Lammers©
Progress on the fishing spear...more refinements to do yet... Photo - ISBC member William Lammers©

 

 I will affix the Spearhead with inner cords of 550 cord, though, if I had a dead coyote, I would use its' tendons, for they shrink, as they dry, making for a very solid bond, spearhead to shaft.

 

 

 

Question from 

Bruce Allen: Do you have the use and know how of machine tools?

William Lammers:  Not as in machine shop tools, but I did carpenter for a few years, and have most of the basic tools, as such. I hand file, and sand just about everything...especially the steel components, as not to soften the metals...

Bruce Allen:  I was referring to making the barbed spear head as to buying it.
William Lammers:  Oh, I am sorry...I make all of my spearheads. From bent, broken, or worn out Recip. Saws, Circular saws, etc...Heck, it is fun, and challenging, and rewarding!